Uncategorised

13
Sep

Wake Your Body Up

Wake Your Body Up is a programme I devised at AiM to empower people to take ownership of their own body. The programme comes in two formats: Wake Your Body up and Wake Your Feet up. For many years I have been all too aware of patients and clients who have struggled along, often needlessly, enduring treatments that were proving

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8
Sep

Bunions – A 6 part series

Hallux Valgus πŸ‘£ When the foot pronates the forefoot abducts away from the body’s midline (see photo above). In this moment the big toe follows the movement of the forefoot – away from the body’s midline. πŸ‘£ A flatter pronated foot is known as a valgus foot. A bunion – although there do appear to be two types of bunion

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8
Sep

Foot joint motions in the sagittal plane

πŸ‘£ Joint motions in the feet in the sagittal plane πŸ‘£ Three segments:Rearfoot βœ…Forefoot βœ…Toes βœ… πŸ‘£ It seems that dorsiflexion and plantarflexion are only ever discussed at the ankle joint (TCJ) and rarely in relation to the bones or segments of the foot πŸ€·πŸ»β€β™‚οΈ πŸ‘£ Dorsiflexion is a direction. That direction is when the distal part of a foot

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8
Sep

Movement Limitations in the Fibula?

πŸ‘£ That fibula… πŸ‘£ A non weight bearing bone… πŸ‘£ How is it that a non-weight bearing bone can play havoc with the whole system? πŸ‘£ Quite simply the system responds to movement … and the fibula has bags of movement potential. We might be guilty of thinking it just sits on the outside of the tibia… doing nothing… πŸ‘£

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8
Sep

Joints ACT: muscles REACT

πŸ‘£ Joints ACT: muscles REACT: πŸ‘£ There is a reason I came up with this 2nd big rule of motion up and dedicated a chapter to it in What The Foot? and that is that Muscles do not move the joints in the way we think they do. πŸ‘£ Sure, contract some tissue and the connected joints do move… BUT

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8
Sep

Internal or External?

πŸ‘£ This image, for me, highlights things overlooked in biomechanics and in particular the movement involved in the biomechanics we are trying to observe. This affects our understanding and choices we make in therapy. πŸ€” πŸ‘£ You see it looks here as though you are observing an internally rotated pair of legs as highlighted by the big red arrows. Internal

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8
Sep

Toe Out?

πŸ‘£ Many many people walk with their feet turned out. And many many people have pronated feet. And yes this is pretty much a direct correlation. I always teach that a turned out foot (or duck πŸ¦† foot) is an indicator that the extensor chain needs firing up… The extensor chain is the muscles of extension such as foot supination

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7
Sep

The Great Exchange

πŸ‘£ So you can’t extend your right knee fully? πŸ‘£ If you can’t extend your right knee, you can’t supinate your right foot. πŸ‘£ If you can’t supinate your right foot, you can’t have access to your extensor chain. πŸ‘£ If you don’t have access to your extensor chain, You can’t propel yourself forwards effectively. πŸ‘£ If you can’t propel

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7
Sep

True Potential of Knee Mechanics

πŸ‘£ If you choose to limit the movement of the knee in order to protect it by minimising it’s movement beyond the ankle or to remain over the second toe, there is a certain irony that you just might NOT be protecting the knee, but putting it at greater risk. πŸ‘£ How? πŸ‘£ Well, simply put (hopefully) the next time

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7
Sep

My Favourite Bone

My favourite bone πŸ‘£ It’s my favourite bone. Why? πŸ€” πŸ‘£ Two reasons. It’s shaped like a triangle and nature loves a triangle. πŸ‘£ So much so it made the triangle the most stable structure in the universe and it’s the mathematical centre of mass of your foot. πŸ‘£ It’s shape is key πŸ”‘ for enabling pronation and supination on

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